They say that when in Rome, do as the Romans do. Having never been in Rome before, I wasn’t quite sure what it is that they do. It only took me about 5 minutes after arriving in the city to tell you what it is that Romans don’t do. Romans don’t use turn signals, they don’t yield to oncoming traffic, and they definitely don’t get stuck in a “bus/taxi only” lane while driving aimlessly around the same circle for over an hour – that last one is what I do! Well, after all of that senseless nonsense, I hope Romans “do” a lot of walking. I threw away my international drivers license, triple-parked the Alfa Romeo I rented, and Rebecca and I explored the entire city on foot. Despite it all, we actually had an amazing time and took plenty of pictures along the way. I hope you like our photographic journey through Rome.

 

I believe this lady needs a tour guide. Too bad she’s stuck with me!

 

 

Becca likes her Beck’s (although she’d much rather have red wine).

One of the great things about Rome is they allow you to walk around with refreshing adult beverages in hand.

 

 

Rebecca sits down to enjoy her first real Italian pizza. 

Actually the pizza was a display and made out of plastic. Rebecca said she already knew that and she only ate it because it was the only one they had with gluten-free crust.

 

 

The Santa Maria dei Monti

This church was erected by Pope Gregory XIII in 1580 in dedication to the blessed virgin, Mary.

 

 

I look tough (even if only in my imagination)!

 

 

Rebecca stands in the forefront as Italian soldiers maintain security.

 

The Arch of Titus

 

 

Roman Capital Police on patrol.

 

 

A Roman street artist displays his craft on an ancient road bustling with tourism.

 

 

Exploring the Roman Imperial Forum – Archeological site.

 

 

Remnants of the columns that once surrounded the Temple of Minerva.

 

 

 

 

Rebecca is hanging out with Emperor Nerva who ruled from 96-98 A.D. 

He must have made quite the impression. He was in power only two years and they gave him a statue!

 

 

“Excuse me sir, which way to Little Caesar’s Pizza? Oh, just over the hill there, thanks!”

 

 

To think, many of these ruins were from a time before even Jesus walked the earth.

 

 

Trajan’s Forum

 

 

Rebecca snaps a shot of the Vittorio Emanuele II Monument. 

 

 

 

 

Buried under this horse and rider lies the tomb of an unknown soldier.

 

 

Believe it or not, this collosal monument is relatively new compared to the rest of Rome’s architecture. Each statue represents certain Roman values such as harmony, liberty, unity, and struggle.

 

 

Geez, man! Have you no modesty?

 

 

He may be carrying a spear and a shield, but it’s hard to take a man seriously when he’s wearing a pigeon on his head.

 

 

Museo Centrale del Risorgimento (Museum of Rome) 

 

 

Forum of Caesar – 54 B.C.

 

 

Breathtaking History of the Glorious Roman Empire.

 

 

 

 

Rome- An archeological wonderland.

 

 

Sorry about that, officer. She’s somewhat of a badge bunny.

 

 

Italian military can be seen on almost every street in Rome.

 

 

This was our digs while in Rome – Best Western Artdeco Hotel. 

 

 

 

 

This is a Roman breakfast. I hope you like cold cuts!

 

 

Rebecca in front of the Hotel Traiano. 

 

 

Sacro Cuore di Gesú al Castro Pretorio (Sacred Heart of Jesus at the Praetorian Barracks)

 

 

 

 

 

 

A tour bus outside the Vittorio Emanuele II Monument. 

 

 

Fontanella del Facchino – street fountain

Whenever I ger thirsty in Rome, I wouldn’t think of filling my cup anywhere but here.

 

 

Security is tight in front of the San Marcello al Corso.

 

 

One of Rome’s many magnificent cathedrals.

 

 

 

 

Do you ever get that paranoid feeling like there’s a man standing behind you watching… with a gun!

 

 

One of the twin churches at the Plaza del Popolo.

 

 

Tourists at the plaza congregate around the ancient Obelisco Flaminio.

 

 

 

 

The Castel Sant’Angelo, once used by popes seeking refuge during times of danger.

 

 

A panoramic view of the Vatican grounds with St. Peter’s Basilica in backdrop.

 

 

A very Roman courtyard inside the Sistine Chapel.

 

 

It took Michaelangelo four pain-staking years painting the ceilings of this most historical chapel.

 

 

Emperor Nero’s purple bath inside the Pio Clementio Museum, Sistine Chapel.

 

 

The Marble Chariot

 

 

Splendidly painted ceilings by world reknown artists.

 

 

 

 

A resurrected Christ appears to astonished disciples in this beautiful tapestry.

 

 

The Gallery of Maps.

 

 

The Regions of Italy decorate the Galley of Maps exit.

 

 

 

 

A group of monks being hung from the rafters.

 

 

Artwork commemorating a new pope.

 

 

This wall is making me blush!

 

 

Why is it that one guy always has to go and ruin everything by showing up naked on a horse?

 

 

 

 

I’ve never seen so many naked people trying to escape a fire but…. can we put a bit of clothes on? There are women and children around!

 

 

The Creation of Adam and other works by Michaelangelo, 1512

This is the artwork that I waited in line for over two hours to see. I’m sorry the shot is somewhat out of focus. We weren’t allowed to take pictures in this room, but sometimes my camera phone goes off unintentionally at completely random moments.

 

 

 

 

 

Behind the scenes look at St. Peter’s Dome

 

 

A serene greenspace in the midst of the Vatican.

 

 

Rebecca takes a gander at the four hamhocks hanging from the door.

 

 

Outside the Santa Maria della Pace (Our Lady of Peace).

 

 

A panoramic view of the Piazza Navona.

 

 

Rebecca poses in front of a baroque fountain in the Piazza Navona.

 

 

 

 

The center fountain designed by world reknown architect, Gianlorenzo Bernini.

 

 

 

 

The intricate details of a painted dome.

 

 

The Trevi Fountain is believed to be the most stunning fountain in all of the world.

This fountain, dating back to ancient Roman in or around 19 B.C.,  provided water to the Roman baths and all of the fountains of central Rome. It is made from the travertine stone; the same material used to build the Colosseum.

 

 

Throw a coin over your shoulder and into the fountain for good luck.

Legend has it that a coin thrown into the fountain will ensure you a return trip back to Rome. This tradition also dates back to the ancient Romans who often threw in coins to make the gods of water smile upon their journey or help them get back home safely. Believe it or not, all of the coins are collected every night and given to an Italian charity.

 

 

Argh, my squinty one-eyed lady pirate!

 

 

Big John and Rebecca saying “addio” to Rome, we’ve got some more world to see!

I hope you enjoyed our little travels through the eternal city. Please check back at my blog soon, and in the meantime, go and have your own traveling adventure!

 

 

Happy travels,

Big John

 

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